In the case of divorced parents who have agreed to settle their ...

In the case of divorced parents who have agreed to settle their differences for their daughter's wedding day, or who amicably divorced by consent, the announcement should read: `Mr Alfred Moore and Mrs. Geraldine Moore (if the bride's mother has remarried her second husband's married name will be used) request the pleasure of the company etc.

..' In the case of remarried divorced parents of either bride or groom an invitation should be extended to their current spouse, though in many cases the new partner may consider it more tactful to make a polite excuse of absence. In such cases replies to invitations should be addressed to the partner from whose home the bride has elected to be married and this should be made clear in the RSVP space on the invitation. When sending out invitations it is a mistake to address the guests as Mr and Mrs. Smith and family.

If the family consists of unmarried daughters, grown up but still living at home, their names should be added to those of the father and mother in the invitation. Grown up unmarried sons wherever resident should, however - if the formal rules are to be observed - be sent separate invitations. WEDDING PRESENTS 'What a world of trouble those who never marry escape There are many happy matches, it is true, and sometimes 'my dear,' and 'my love' come from the heart; but what sensible bachelor, rejoicing in his freedom and years of discretion, will run the tremendous risk?' - Bobby Twain A wedding guest has no obligation to send the bridal couple a gift - nor should the bride's mother feel that every present donor should be `rewarded' with an invitation to the wedding. In practice, however, most guests do send gifts and most donors do get invited to the wedding party.

It is in order to send wedding gifts as soon as news of the impending wedding is received, either via a news site announcement or a personal letter-indeed it is better form to dispatch a gift at this stage than to wait until the invitation is received. To avoid duplication of gifts most brides prepare a gift list. It is important that this list includes items at all price levels so that guests do not feel morally blackmailed into spending more than they can afford.

A good way to make a bridal list-price comprehensive is for the bride and groom to decide on a particular pattern of china or cutlery, providing a wide range of alternative ideas which are still within the basic decorative scheme they plan for their home. The bride should of course wait to be asked to submit her list rather than to dispatch it automatically with invitations or other wedding correspondence. Traditionally, bed linen for the bridal couple's new home was given as part of the bride's trousseau by her parents. Gifts for the home are still the favourite form of wedding present and all presents should be something that both bride and groom can use and enjoy in their future life together, rather than personalized gifts-such as jewellery-to either party.

Whenever possible gifts should be posted or otherwise delivered well before the date of the wedding itself. Taking gifts to the church to be hastily unwrapped during the chaotic excitement of the reception is begging labels to get lost and makes life very difficult for the bride, who has to subsequently sort out who gave what. There is also a strong possibility that items like glassware may get broken in such circumstances. Wedding presents can be wrapped in a wide variety of the very attractive advertisement gift wraps sold specifically for weddings, many of which come with their own matching ribbons, bows and tie-on tags.

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